Multi-level marketing has touched us all – whether it be purchasing beauty products, essential oils, or health supplements from a friend through social media, or receiving an invitation to join a team of seemingly successful people working their “side hustle.”  But multi-level marketing is now getting some additional multi-level attention, both in the media and in the court room.
Continue Reading Multi-Level Marketing Gets Multi-Level Attention

The COVID-19 pandemic caused supply chain interruptions across industries, from toilet paper and cleaning supplies, to red meat.  Although most states have resumed close to “normal” capacity and operations, the nation still faces an historic and unprecedented lumber shortage.  As a result of this perfect storm, prices for lumber and other building materials have skyrocketed since the start of the pandemic, and have only just begun to fall, as the increasing supply struggles to catch up with still very high demand.
Continue Reading Pandemic Demand Causes Unprecedented Building Supply Shortage

On October 15, 2020, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas granted conditional certification to a class of assistant managers in 550 wireless retail stores across the country. In Martinez v. Mobilelink, assistant store managers in the wireless retailers’ stores alleged that they were regularly required to work unpaid overtime. The employees sought to certify a class consisting of all current and former AMs employed by Mobilelink from March 2017 through the present.
Continue Reading Wireless Retailer Faces Conditionally Certified Nationwide Class of Workers with Overtime Claims Despite Official Company Policy Against Off-The-Clock Work

Last week the Eleventh Circuit delivered a surprising blow to class action settlement practice finding that 19th century Supreme Court precedent “prohibit[s] the type of incentive award that the district court approved here–one that compensates a class representative for his time and rewards him for bringing a lawsuit,” a type of incentive award that is “commonplace in modern class-action litigation.”
Continue Reading Eleventh Circuit Relies on 19th Century Precedent to Find That Class Representative Cannot Recover Commonly-Used Incentive Award

Two putative class actions recently filed in the Northern District of California preview a new theory of consumer claims relating to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. Rather than rely on alleged omissions or representations about health risks, the plaintiffs claim that they relied on marketing statements that indicated the products they purchased were disposable and would completely degrade over time and that the presence of PFAS in the products means those marketing statements were false.
Continue Reading Is a Wave of PFAS Consumer Class Actions on the Horizon?

As reported on Hunton Andrews Kurth’s Privacy & Information Security Law Blog on January 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that an allegation of “actual injury or adverse effect” is not required to establish standing to sue under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act.
Continue Reading Illinois Supreme Court Says Biometric-Data Protection Law Does Not Require Allegation of Actual Injury

Retailers sued in state court might be pleasantly surprised to learn that the presence of a forum defendant may not always prevent removal to federal court based on diversity of citizenship. A procedural maneuver known as “snap removal” can allow a defendant to remove such a case in certain situations.
Continue Reading “Snap” to It When Your Company Is Sued in State Court

Branded keyword advertising—bidding for your company’s website to feature prominently near a search engine’s results for branded or trademarked terms—has been around for over a decade. But a recent line of cases concerning branded keyword advertising should be of concern to all online vendors.
Continue Reading Exposure for Branded Keyword Advertising in Hospitality and Retail