As reported on the Hunton Employment & Labor Perspectives blog, say an employee slips $20 from the register and even admits to it when you show the camera footage. Or, more innocently, say an employee is overpaid $20 entirely by accident. If the employee refuses to give it back, should you deduct the $20 from the employee’s paycheck? Continue Reading Employee Theft: Can Employers Deduct Suspected or Known Theft from an Employee’s Paycheck?

This past week, several consumer actions made headlines that affect the retail industry.

District Court Sides with FTC Over Weight-Loss Supplement Marketers

A federal district judge in Atlanta issued an order last week finding several supplement marketers in contempt for violating previous court orders and continuing to market weight-loss dietary supplements. The contempt order, which imposes a judgment in excess of $40 million, provides that the FTC may use the money to refund product purchasers. The defendants, including one FTC repeat offender, deceptively marketed their supplements as fat-burning and appetite-curbing, and promised rapid and extreme weight loss. Continue Reading Consumer Protection in Retail: Weekly Roundup

This past week, several consumer actions were made that affect the retail industry.

NetSpend Settles Deceptive Advertising Claims with FTC

NetSpend Corp recently agreed to settle FTC allegations that the company deceived consumers about access to funds deposited to debit cards. The FTC voted to approve the stipulated final order, with Commissioner McSweeney and former Commissioner Ramirez voting to approve and Acting Chairman Ohlhausen dissenting. Continue Reading Consumer Protection in Retail: Weekly Roundup

The Missouri Legislature is considering an amendment to the state’s constitution that would prohibit the state from imposing penalties on individuals who, due to sincere religious beliefs, refuse to participate in or provide goods and services for marriages or wedding ceremonies of same-sex couples. The “religious freedom” bill has been approved by the Missouri Senate and is currently pending before the House of Representatives. If the bill is passed, the proposed constitutional amendment will appear on the state’s ballot in November.

Continue Reading Religious Freedom Laws See Opposition from Business Community